rss search

next page next page close
thumbnail Gate zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Goddess zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Mermaid zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Baby Crow zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Rabbit zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Gorilla zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Half Moon zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Standing Forward Fold zoom
next page next page close
thumbnail Dolphin zoom
next page next page close Master the breath of fire and it is the key to higher consciousness."
next page next page close
thumbnail Half Lotus Tree zoom
next page next page close

Yamas & Niyamas

Yamas & Niyamas, #1-2 of 8 rungs (Yoga Sutras 2.30-2.34)

2.30 Non-injury or non-harming (ahimsa), truthfulness (satya), abstention from stealing (asteya), walking in awareness of the highest reality (brahmacharya), and non-possessiveness or non-grasping with the senses (aparigraha) are the five yamas, or codes of self-regulation or restraint, and are the first of the eight steps of Yoga.

2.31 These codes of self-regulation or restraint become a great vow when they become universal and are not restricted by any consideration of the nature of the kind of living being to whom one is related, nor in any place, time or situation.

2.32 Cleanliness and purity of body and mind (shaucha), an attitude of contentment (santosha), ascesis or training of the senses (tapas), self-study and reflection on sacred words (svadhyaya), and an attitude of letting go into one’s source (ishvarapranidhana) are the observances or practices of self-training (niyamas), and are the second rung on the ladder of Yoga.

2.33 When these codes of self-regulation or restraint (yamas) and observances or practices of self-training (niyamas) are inhibited from being practiced due to perverse, unwholesome, troublesome, or deviant thoughts, principles in the opposite direction, or contrary thought should be cultivated.

2.34 Actions arising out of such negative thoughts are performed directly by oneself, caused to be done through others, or approved of when done by others. All of these may be preceded by, or performed through anger, greed or delusion, and can be mild, moderate or intense in nature. To remind oneself that these negative thoughts and actions are the causes of unending misery and ignorance is the contrary thought, or principle in the opposite direction that was recommended in the previous sutra.

Benefits from Yamas & Niyamas (Yoga Sutras 2.35-2.45)

2.35 As a Yogi becomes firmly grounded in non-injury (ahimsa), other people who come near will naturally lose any feelings of hostility.

2.36 As truthfulness (satya) is achieved, the fruits of actions naturally result according to the will of the Yogi.

2.37 When non-stealing (asteya) is established, all jewels, or treasures present themselves, or are available to the Yogi.

2.38 When walking in the awareness of the highest reality (brahmacharya) is firmly established, then a great strength, capacity, or vitality (virya) is acquired.

2.39 When one is steadfast in non-possessiveness or non-grasping with the senses (aparigraha), there arises knowledge of the why and wherefore of past and future incarnations.

2.40 Through cleanliness and purity of body and mind (shaucha), one develops an attitude of distancing, or disinterest towards one’s own body, and becomes disinclined towards contacting the bodies of others.

2.41 Also through cleanliness and purity of body and mind (shaucha) comes a purification of the subtle mental essence (sattva), a pleasantness, goodness and gladness of feeling, a one-pointedness with intentness, the conquest or mastery over the senses, and a fitness, qualification, or capability for self-realization.

2.42 From an attitude of contentment (santosha), unexcelled happiness, mental comfort, joy, and satisfaction is obtained.

2.43 Through ascesis or training of the senses (tapas), there comes a destruction of mental impurities, and an ensuing mastery or perfection over the body and the mental organs of senses and actions (indriyas).

2.44 From self-study and reflection on sacred words (svadhyaya), one attains contact, communion, or concert with that underlying natural reality or force.

2.45 From an attitude of letting go into one’s source (ishvarapranidhana), the state of perfected concentration (samadhi) is attained.

Source: SwamiJ


next pagenext page
thumbnail Gate article post
thumbnail Goddess article post
thumbnail Mermaid article post
thumbnail Baby Crow article post
thumbnail Rabbit article post
thumbnail Gorilla article post
thumbnail Half Moon article post
thumbnail Standing Forward Fold article post
thumbnail Dolphin article post
"Master the breath of fire and it is the key to higher consciousness."
article post
thumbnail Half Lotus Tree article post

Yamas & Niyamas

Yamas & Niyamas, #1-2 of 8 rungs (Yoga Sutras 2.30-2.34) 2.30 Non-injury or...
article post